'Ban Donald Trump' petition: Map of signatures shows 400,000 supporters spread through every part of Britain

David Cameron, Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn are among politicians speaking out against his call to stop Muslims entering the US

Lizzie Dearden
Wednesday 09 December 2015 20:07
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Trump had called for Muslims to be banned from the US
Trump had called for Muslims to be banned from the US

The hundreds of thousands of people who have signed a petition to block Donald Trump from entering the UK are spread the length and breadth of Britain, analysis has shown.

Cartographers at Esri UK mapped the distribution of more than 400,000 signatures to show where disdain for the Republican Presidential hopeful is strongest.

Support for the petition was broadly concentrated in urban areas, especially London, Bristol, Brighton, Glasgow, Aberdeen, Manchester and Birmingham.

Every single electoral constituency in Britain was represented by Wednesday afternoon but the fewest supporters were found in Na h-Eileanan an Iar, Scotland, with 59 signatories, and other dominantly rural areas, mainly in Wales.

“If the United Kingdom is to continue applying the ‘unacceptable behaviour’ criteria to those who wish to enter its borders, it must be fairly applied to the rich as well as poor, and the weak as well as powerful,” the petition started by Suzanne Kelly read.

The Government website hosting it was receiving so many visitors on Wednesday that it crashed several times because of the demand.

Having crossed the benchmark of 100,000 signatures, it must now be considered for debate in the House of Commons.

Trump appeared to hit back at its supporters, writing on Twitter that they “don't know what they're getting into”.

He was replying to a tweet from journalist Piers Morgan who asked: “Have any of the 200k+ Brits who've signed the petition to ban Trump signed any petition to ban UK terror suspects returning from Iraq/Syria?”

Trump’s call for Muslims to be temporarily banned from entering the UK in the wake of a mass shooting by suspected extremists in California has provoked outrage around the world.

British politicians – including David Cameron and London mayor Boris Johnson –condemned his remarks but Chancellor George Osborne rejected calls to ban Trump, instead calling for a “robust debate” to defeat his “nonsense”.

The Republican Presidential hopeful was also ridiculed for claiming that parts of London and Paris are “so radicalised” police officers are “afraid for their very lives”

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