UK beaches flooded with bank holiday daytrippers

Photos show coastline packed with hundreds of socially distanced groups enjoying sunny weather

Britons flocked to beaches and parks across UK to enjoy bank holiday sun

Britons flocked to beaches and parks on bank holiday Monday on what could be the hottest day of the year.

People from across the UK headed to the beach as the sun beamed down for the third consecutive day of the holiday.

Photographs show groups enjoying themselves on the sand and in the sea.

Thanet council in Kent warned people beaches could become overcrowded and urged visitors to turn back at Broadstairs, Margate and Ramsgate, saying “We’re not back to normal just yet.”

Similarly, Transport for Greater Manchester (TfGM) reported “long delays” heading north out of Greater Manchester towards Blackpool and the M55, with delays of up to 40 minutes on the M6 and M61.

“If you are thinking of heading to the coast today, please consider rerouting or delaying your journey to avoid the congestion,” TfGM said.

People gather in the good weather at Boscombe beach, Dorset

Bournemouth beach in Dorset appeared packed, with hundreds of socially distanced groups enjoying the weather.

Similar scenes could be seen on Boscombe beach in Dorset, with many sheltering under umbrellas from the sweltering sun.

Paddleboarders took to the sea at Portobello beach near Edinburgh.

A paddleboarder off Portobello beach, near Edinburgh

On New Brighton beach in Wirral, Merseyside, ice sculptures of children were created to highlight climate change.

The 26 sculptures, which will be washed away by the sea, were created along with a 120m sand drawing by artists from Sand In Your Eye.

As part of the installation, designed to highlight the importance of global climate conference Cop26, 26 children and their families stood alongside the ice sculptures holding plaques showing the names of global leaders.

Some of the 26 ice sculptures of children installed on New Brighton beach, Wallasey, in Merseyside

The Met Office has forecast that temperatures could reach 25C on Monday, beating the 24.5C high for 2021 set at Kew Gardens on 30 March.

Temperatures across the rest of the UK are expected to be at least in the low 20s, even in northern Scotland.

“The only exception is along the east coast – there is quite a lot of low cloud, mist and fog in east-coast areas and that will stay for the next few days, so highs of between 12C (53.6F) and 16C (60.8F) there – quite a lot lower than elsewhere,” said Becky Mitchell, a meteorologist from the Met Office.

People enjoy the hot weather on Bournemouth beach, Dorset

Ms Mitchell warned the lush weather could be followed by thunderstorms.

“There will potentially be some thunderstorms by midweek – the first bout of showers will come into parts of the southwest and there will be a few thunderstorms in that,” she said.

The Met Office warned previously that levels of harmful UV light will be very high over the coming days, and advised people to wear plenty of sunscreen.

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