Bin collection moves to once every four weeks in bid to encourage recycling

Calls to roll scheme out across the country backed by councillor

Harry Cockburn
Monday 19 September 2016 16:00
Comments
Conservative Clwyd West Assembly Member Darren Millar said the plans were 'absolutely ridiculous'
Conservative Clwyd West Assembly Member Darren Millar said the plans were 'absolutely ridiculous'

A trial is underway in which bins will only be emptied once a month in a bid to boost levels of recycling.

About 10,300 homes in Conwy, north Wales, will be affected by the change which aims to cut the council’s £1.75m annual bill for disposing of unnecessary waste in landfill sites.

Recycling and food waste will still be collected weekly.

The less frequent black bin collections follow a survey of more than 11,000 people.

The council also found over a year-long period that more than half the items placed in black bins in the county should have been recycled.

Conwy councillor Dave Cowans told the Independent the response to the decision has been “quietly positive”.

He said: “The data we had from our consultation indicated a high percentage of support to go along this route.

“We spoke to fellow authorities where they’d introduced three-weekly collections and once they had collected the data, some said they wished they’d gone for four-weekly. But we need our own evidence.

“We will look at the data, see how it’s going and take notice of any increase in fly tipping.”

Asked if he thought the system should be rolled out nationally, Mr Cowans said: “It’s recognised that to be green is good and a public body needs to recognise that. But we would have pursued this anyway. No sensible council could ever justify wasting £1.7m of public money.”

However, Conservative Clwyd West Assembly Member Darren Millar described the plans as “absolutely ridiculous” and claimed it would lead to a rise in fly tipping, litter and pest control incidents.

“I don't want that laid at the door of the local authority, and that's why I want them to step back from these proposals and to crack on with the fortnightly collections that people have now,” he told the BBC.

In response to the criticisms, Mr Cowans said: “You expect flack, but change always produces flack.

“There shouldn’t be rats if you don’t put food in your bin. We take the food waste away every week and make electricity out of it. I’m proud to be associated with it.”

The council is also explaining the changes to children.

“They’re the ones who often put the pressure to recycle on their parents,” Mr Cowans said. “We maximise that. We’ve got a great presentation team that go out to schools, and you see the effect in the areas where we’ve done this. It really is quite marked. It’s a generational change. We’ll look back and think ‘my God, did we used to do that?’”

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in