Bishop Michael Curry: The 'stunning preacher' who addressed the royal wedding ceremony

Leader of the Episcopal Church in the US is winning praise for his passionate sermon

Tom Barnes
Saturday 19 May 2018 14:38
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Royal Wedding: Bishop Michael Curry discussing the importance of the occasion

On a day where royalty, celebrities and of course Prince Harry and Meghan Markle were all expected to draw the attention of the world, one vicar emerged as an unlikely star of the show.

Bishop Michael Curry has found himself in the spotlight after he delivered a lively speech during the service, removed from the usual pomp and solemnity of such occasions.

His energetic sermon, which both started and finished with quotes from minister and civil rights activist Martin Luther King, has already received widespread praise.

“There’s power in love. Do not underestimate it. Anyone who has ever fallen in love knows what I mean,” he began.

“When love is the way, we actually treat each other, well, like we are actually family.

“When love is the way, we know that god is the source for us all, that we are brothers and sisters, children of God.

“My brothers and sisters that’s a new heaven, a new earth, a new world, a new human family.”

“With this, I’ll sit down,” he told the couple as he began wrap up his speech: “We gotta get y’all married.”

His style earned him plaudits on social media, including from Labour MPs David Lammy and Ed Miliband, who paid tribute on Twitter.

Meanwhile, the bishop himself is using his new-found fame as an opportunity to promote his faith to a worldwide audience.

But who is the Bishop Michael Curry and how did he rise through the ranks on his way to speaking at the royal wedding?

Explained: Who is royal wedding vicar Bishop Michael Curry?

Bishop Curry is the current head of the Episcopal Church, having been appointed in 2015.

Born in Chicago, the 53-year-old Yale graduate is the first African American to lead the Anglican organisation.

He was appointed Bishop of North Carolina in 2000, a position he held for a decade-and-a-half until his election as the 27th leader of the Episcopal Church.

Royal wedding: Fans explain why they've come to Windsor to see Harry and Meghan marry

On his appointment, he called for racial and economic unity at a time of rising tensions in the United States.

Throughout his career, Bishop Curry has been outspoken on matters of social justice such as same-sex-marriage and immigration policy.

His principled stands on such issues have earned him praise from the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby.

The archbishop described Bishop Curry as a “brilliant pastor” and “stunning preacher” upon hearing the news he would speak at the royal wedding.

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