City lets protesters stay at St Paul's until Christmas

 

Richard Hall,Cahal Milmo
Thursday 03 November 2011 01:00
Comments

Protesters camped outside St Paul's Cathedral have been given permission by the Square Mile's governing body to stay until the new year.

At a meeting between the two sides yesterday, the Corporation of London said it was happy for the camp to remain as long as a clear path for fire access was made in the church yard, a spokesman for the demonstrators said.

St Paul's suspended legal action against the protest camp on Tuesday, and the corporation followed suit by pausing planned legal action to remove the protesters.

After meeting with a corporation lawyer, camp spokeswoman Tina Rothery said the protesters will discuss a request for a proposed reduction in the number of tents. "We would have to make a slight reduction in tents in order to free up space for the fire brigade," she said. "We are delighted. This is a great U-turn from the Corporation of London, and following the backing of the Archbishop and St Paul's, this is proving to be an exciting time for our movement."

Ms Rothery added that the offer would be discussed at a general assembly of protesters at the site. The corporation was unavailable for comment.

Rowan Williams, Archbishop of Canterbury, yesterday received a hostile response from the City to his support for a "Robin Hood tax" on banks.

He expressed sympathy with the protesters on Tuesday, saying that a tax on financial transactions would be one measure that would advance their aims.

David Buik, of City brokers BGC Partners, said the tax would fall disproportionately on the British economy and cost 500,000 jobs. He said: "When I want His Grace's divine intervention on how to get to heaven then I will seek his counsel. But when it comes to how we should run the economy, I would ask him to listen to [Chancellor] George Osborne."

David Cameron backed Dr Williams' call for greater responsibility from financiers but poured cold water on his attempt to promote a tax on financial transactions – Mr Cameron said the Government would only support such a measure if it was adopted globally.

The Archbishop received support from 70 organisations including Oxfam and the TUC, who sent a letter to Mr Cameron saying the levy would be "the most popular tax in history".

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged in