Curry and cottage pie top list of UK’s favourite comfort foods, survey claims

Results show average Briton spends around £277 on feel good meals

Rob Knight
Friday 05 October 2018 14:13
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59 per cent of those surveyed said they did not think about nutritional benefits when choosing a 'pick-me-up' meal
59 per cent of those surveyed said they did not think about nutritional benefits when choosing a 'pick-me-up' meal

Curry, Chinese and cottage pie are among the nation’s favourite comfort foods, according to a new survey. Other favourites included bangers and mash, lasagne and spaghetti Bolognese.

It also emerged the average respondent would tuck into comfort food nine times a month – typically spending £277 on it every year.

For 31 per cent, the key factor in deciding what was comforting to eat was how filling it is, while 27 per cent wanted a meal which required minimal effort to prepare.

Researchers questioned 2,000 UK adults.

“Our research has shown that as the cold weather approaches, people are turning to comfort foods and seven in 10 people admitted that their favourite comfort foods often aren’t the healthiest choices," said Bev Mitchell, trading director for Iceland, which commissioned the poll.

When it came to sweet or savoury, four in 10 tended to opt for the latter with just 28 per cent going for sweeter dishes. In fact, the list appeared to reflect this, with the top 40 dominated by savoury dishes.

However, sticky toffee pudding and fruit crumble also appeared.

The research also found 59 per cent of people also did not give a moment’s thought to nutritional benefits when choosing a pick-me-up meal.

Seven in 10 admitted their favourite comfort foods tended to be bad for them, with 43 per cent saying they indulged in comfort foods “more than they should”.

However, 57 per cent agreed “healthy” and “comfort foods” did not have to be mutually exclusive – arguing both were possible.

Half also wished there were more comfort food options available which were good for you.

A third said they tended to eat comfort foods to reward themselves, 23 per cent tucked into them when they were stressed and almost a fifth indulged when they were under the weather.

When choosing their morale boosting meal, 36 per cent turned to dishes they enjoyed as kids and one in 10 plumped for something prepared by someone else.

SWNS

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