The common driving thank you gestures that could see you fined £1000

Flashing headlights and a thumbs up could have pricey consequences

<p>A simple wave while driving could set motorists back £1000 </p>

A simple wave while driving could set motorists back £1000

Some common road habits drivers think are harmless could set them back up to £1000, according to the Highway Code.

Drivers tend to flash their headlights as a show of thanks to being given way, or wave a hand to signal gratitude - but both of these actions could result in a hefty fine.

Here are three common things drivers do which could lead to a fine:

Waving hand or thumbs up

A simple wave or a thumbs up by a driver is a breach of having control of the vehicle and can rack up a fine of up to £1000, discretionary disqualification or three penalty points, according to rule 160 of the Highway Code.

This may come as a shock to many as according to a study by National Tyres and Autocare, one in three drivers choose the classic wave to say thanks on the road.

A simple wave or a thumbs up by a driver is a possible breach of having control of the vehicle and can rack up a £1000 fine

The Code says the motorist should “drive or ride with both hands on the wheel or handlebars where possible”.

It adds: “This will help you to remain in full control of the vehicle at all times. You may use driver assistance systems while you are driving. Make sure you use any system according to the manufacturer’s instructions.”

Flashing headlights

While many drivers flash their headlights to let other motorists know they can go past and as a way of saying thank you, this simple act could leave them with a £1000 fine if caught.

According to Rule 110 of the Highway Code, drivers must “only flash your headlights to let other road users know that you are there. Do not flash your headlights to convey any other message or intimidate other road users.”

Hazard lights

Although hazard lights is less misused, there is still a possibility of gaining a £1000 fine for keeping the warning lights on for too long.

According to rule 116 of the Highway Code: “You MUST NOT use hazard warning lights while driving or being towed unless you are on a motorway or unrestricted dual carriageway and you need to warn drivers behind you of a hazard or obstruction ahead. Only use them for long enough to ensure that your warning has been observed.”

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