Family of Howard Lew Lewis claims Blackadder star was killed by NHS drug overdose

The 76-year-old was being treated for dementia in an Edinburgh hospital when he died

Chloe Farand
Sunday 28 January 2018 13:31
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Howard Lew Lewis died in an Edinburgh hospital last week
Howard Lew Lewis died in an Edinburgh hospital last week

The family of British actor Howard Lew Lewis has claimed the Blackadder star was killed by a drug overdose administrated by the NHS.

The 76-year-old, also known as "Lewy", died on 20 January in a community hospital in Edinburgh where he was being treated for dementia.

But his family has accused the hospital of unexpectedly changing his medication just before Christmas.

Mr Lewis' daughter, Deborah Milazzo, told the Mail on Sunday: "My dad was killed by the NHS."

"My father didn't have cancer, he didn't have heart disease. They suddenly just changed his medication and it was the new medication that killed him," she said.

According to the Sunday paper, Mr Lewis was being administrated a combination of Alfentanil, an opiate about 30 times stronger than oral morphine, and Midazolam, a sedative used in end-of-life care.

A former NHS executive told the Mail the drug combination would only be appropriate for a patient in "the terminal phase of a malignant disease" but Ms Milazzo insisted her father had not received a terminal diagnosis.

Scottish police are reportedly investigating Mr Lewis' death but no-one was able to confirm an investigation was underway at time of publication.

Alongside Blackadder, Mr Lewis appeared in Maid Marian, Her Merry Men and Brush Strokes.

Dr Tracey Gillies, medical director of NHS Lothian Trust, told the Mail on Sunday: "It would not be appropriate to discuss any details from his medical record.

"If the family have concerns or questions, they should contact us."

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