Man flies to Germany on girlfriend’s passport as airport security fail to spot the difference

Michael Randall showed the travel document during security checks at Gatwick Airport in London and later boarded an easyJet flight to Berlin

Jeff Farrell
Monday 28 August 2017 17:54
Comments
Mr Randall picked up his girlfriend Charlotte Bull’s passport by mistake while rushing to catch an early morning flight
Mr Randall picked up his girlfriend Charlotte Bull’s passport by mistake while rushing to catch an early morning flight

A man has flown from London to Germany on an easyJet flight using his girlfriend’s passport – despite her having long blonde hair compared to his short-cut style.

Michael Randall, a McLaren Formula 1 team technician, passed through security checks at Gatwick Airport unhindered and later showed the travel document to cabin crew as he boarded the Airbus plane to Berlin.

He said he had accidentally picked up the wrong ID when he left his home in Staines, Middlesex in the early hours of the morning.

But the authorities in Berlin's Schoenefeld were eventually alerted to the fact he was using his girlfriend Charlotte Bull’s passport and questioned him for 90 minutes before finally letting him enter the city on a one-day visa.

Mr Randall, 23, said: “It’s outrageous I got that far. EasyJet are meant to check the name against the boarding pass but they obviously didn’t.

“It’s very worrying as I don’t even look like Charlotte.”

Ms Bull, 34, said: “It was a terrible breach of security, even more so considering how scary current times are.”

The couple, who live together, had just returned from a holiday in France when Mr Randall lifted the wrong passport for his trip to Berlin the morning after.

He told the Sunday People: “The first I knew something was wrong was when I arrived at Berlin airport. I thought honesty was the best policy so I went and told security.

“They pulled me aside and made me wait for the whole plane to disembark. At first I thought they were going to confiscate Charlotte’s passport.”

Mr Randall had travelled to Berlin to see a motorbike race and later that day a colleague who was travelling to the same event from Britain brought his co-worker’s passport with him.

An easyJet spokeswoman said the right passport details were entered online but “visual identification” on boarding should have spotted the error.

She said: "We are investigating how the passenger was able to travel from London Gatwick with the incorrect documentation.”

It came just a month after a tourist claimed he flew home from Ibiza to Manchester on his friend's passport.

Scott Morgan, 27, said he picked up friend Dominic Carroll’s travel document the morning after the pair had a night out in the resort of San Antonio.

British Airways launched a probe after the apparent security breach came to light on one of their flights. Officials in Manchester Airport and the Home Office are also investigating.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in