Off the menu: More food supply shortages hit McDonald’s

The fast-food giant says it is working to resolve the issues ‘as quickly as possible’

<p>McDonald’s said it is ‘working hard to resolve the issues as quickly as possible’ </p>

McDonald’s said it is ‘working hard to resolve the issues as quickly as possible’

McDonald’s has been left in a pickle after being hit by ingredient shortages at several of its outlets.

It comes 10 months after the fast-food giant halted sales of milkshakes and bottled drinks nationwide, which at the time was blamed on Brexit, the Covid-19 pandemic, and the subsequent shortage of lorry drivers.

But fears that other cult favourites will be struck from the menu have been reignited recently as signs began popping up in some McDonald’s branches.

One notice, pasted on the counter at McDonald’s on the King’s Road, Chelsea, south London, reads: “Due to supply chain challenges, some menu items may be served with some ingredients missing and others may be temporarily unavailable.

“We apologise in advance to any customers impacted and thank you for your patience.”

A spokesperson for McDonald’s said: “Like most retailers, we are currently experiencing pressures across our supply chain which, at times, may impact a small number of our menu items at certain restaurants.

“We apologise for any inconvenience, and thank our customers for their patience. We are working hard to resolve the issues as quickly as possible.”

It comes as food prices are set to soar this summer with the spiralling rate of inflation potentially lasting into the middle of next year, according to the Institute of Grocery Distribution (IGD).

In a report, published last month, it predicted prices will rise by 15 per cent in the coming months as people pay more for household staples such as meat, cereal, dairy, fruit and vegetable products.

Food items that rely on wheat – such as bread, poultry and pork – could see the most rapid price rises in the summer or autumn, the IGD said.

These household staples are likely to be the worst affected because of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine since the countries are both major global grain producers.

The report warned the price hike could see more people skipping meals as it predicted the average monthly groceries bill for a family of four could reach £439 in January next year, up from £396 in the same month this year.

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