House prices: Good-looking gardens may increase value, poll suggests

Almost two-thirds of homeowners worried about the loss of greenery in their gardens

Floriane Laroche
Wednesday 25 May 2022 10:05 BST
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One-third of Britons have developed a greater interest in gardening since the coronavirus pandemic hit
One-third of Britons have developed a greater interest in gardening since the coronavirus pandemic hit (Getty Images)

A greener garden could be the key to boosting a home’s value, according to a poll which found 57 per cent of Britons would pay more for a property featuring top-grade greenery.

A survey of 2,000 adults found many considered a tidy front garden a key feature – with 62 per cent claiming it attracted them to properties above other factors such as the condition of the roof (50 per cent) or walls (47 per cent).

Britons also looked to nature to ensure their homes stood out, pollsters found. Almost two-thirds of homeowners worried about the loss of greenery in their gardens.

And those who invested their time in gardening reaped the benefits, as three-quarters said they preferred natural grass to artificial alternatives.

The survey showed being green was not easy for everyone. Nearly 26 per cent lacked knowledge about plants and 21 per cent thought gardening was physically demanding. One-fifth (19 per cent) simply said they did not have enough time for it.

However, more than three-quarters (77 per cent) were willing to change their gardening habits, with almost half prepared to create more habitats for wildlife. Four in 10 invested in planting native plants and more than one-third said they had introduced more natural greenery, such as lawned areas, shrubs and trees.

The research, commissioned by Honda, revealed that the coronavirus pandemic had changed people’s views on gardening, with one-third more interested in the pastime now than before March 2020.

The typical homeowner spent an average of 168 minutes per week in their garden during the spring and summer months. Regardless of the weather conditions, some gardeners still maintained a weekly routine of 102 minutes between September and February.

It also emerged gardens have become a central part of most people’s daily lives. Homeowners enjoyed relaxing (67 per cent), entertaining friends and family (39 per cent), eating (36 per cent) and keeping their pets (24 per cent) outside.

And more than seven in 10 believed gardening improved their mental health.

Kate Gould, a garden designer and RHS Chelsea Flower Show Gold winner, said: “Gardens are the natural wealth of a property and create the first and last impression for potential buyers.

“If a garden has some nicely maintained greenery, it’s far more likely to stand out. With so many artificial alternatives on offer – which don’t always reduce maintenance levels – the appeal of a green space can soon be lost.

“We mustn’t forget what role our green spaces play beyond looking aesthetically pleasing. It’s all about balancing practicality with a shared goal of not forgetting about nature.”

Steve Morris, from Honda, said: “We know life is busier than ever, and this often stops us from keeping a garden green. However, technology is on our side.”

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