Emir's fashion designer son found dead at London luxury apartment in 'unexpected' circumstances

Three days of mourning declared in UAE after death of ‘great artist’

Jon Sharman
Thursday 04 July 2019 09:54
Comments
Prayer ceremony held for son of Emirati ruler at King Faisal mosque in Sharjah

The son of an Emirati ruler has been found dead in “unexpected circumstances” at an apartment in upscale Knightsbridge, west London.

Crown prince Khalid al Qasimi, a fashion designer, was found unresponsive when emergency workers were called to the upmarket address, reportedly a penthouse, on Monday morning.

The 39-year-old was the second son of Dr Sheikh Sultan bin Mohammed al Qasimi, ruler of Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

The Metropolitan Police said the death was being treated as unexplained, and that an initial post-mortem examination carried out on Tuesday failed to identify a cause of death.

The force said no arrests had been made and that detectives’ inquiries were ongoing.

Paramedics were called at 10.32am on Monday “to reports of an incident”, London Ambulance Service said.

“We sent an ambulance crew and a medic in a car to the scene. Sadly a person was pronounced dead at the scene,” a spokesman said, but was unable to confirm what the victim was treated for.

The Emirati-born designer founded an eponymous fashion brand in 2016 and had presented his collections at London and Paris fashion weeks.

Three days of mourning have been announced in the UAE following the death of the “great philosopher and artist”, with flags flying at half-mast.

He was laid to rest on Wednesday morning in Sharjah, and a funeral prayer was held at the nearby King Faisal Mosque.

Mariano Vivanco, the photographer, called the designer “my angel” while prince Fahad al Saud of Saudi Arabia said: “This is so sad, I loved his work. Rest in power.”

Mr Al Qasimi moved to the UK from the UAE aged nine, and was educated at the expensive Tonbridge School where he was awarded an art scholarship upon entry.

He went on to study French and Spanish at University College London, before later completing a degree at the Association School of Architecture, according to his website.

He later studied architecture and fashion design at Central Saint Martins in London, and launched his first fashion label, Qasimi Homme, in 2008.

A statement on the Qasimi website said: “Khalid was praised for his tenacious yet sensitive exploration of social-political issues, particularly pertaining to the Middle East and its sometimes strained relationship with the West, a subject very close to his heart and upbringing.

“His goal was to create ‘a world of beautifully crafted products infused with cultural, social and political undertones to inform and inspire’.

“The design world has lost a great philosopher and artist.”

Mr Al Qasimi’s brother, Sheikh Mohammed bin Sultan Al Qasimi, died of a heroin overdose in 1999. The ruler of the Emirate state of Sharjah found his eldest son dead on the floor of his quarters in the family’s £3m English manor house in Sussex, an inquest heard at the time.

Additional reporting by PA

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged in