London attack: Capital's residents urged to visit bars and restaurants in show of 'unity'

Campaign launched to encourage people to enjoy nightlife a week after terrorists launched deadly assault 

Lucy Pasha-Robinson
Sunday 11 June 2017 16:32
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Two men drink beer outside the Southwark Tavern which reopened for business today next to an entrance to Borough Market which remains closed in London
Two men drink beer outside the Southwark Tavern which reopened for business today next to an entrance to Borough Market which remains closed in London

Londoners are being urged to visit the capital’s bars and restaurants in a show of “unity and resilience” following last weekend’s terror attack.

The British Red Cross launched a campaign to encourage people to make a point of going out and refuse to be cowed after terrorists launched a deadly assault on London Bridge and Borough Market last Saturday, killing eight people and injuring dozens more.

The campaign will see restaurants donating proceeds from certain dishes and bars will ask punters to donate the price of a drink to the charity’s UK Solidarity Fund.

Taxi firm Uber will also donate a pound for every journey between 8pm and midnight on Saturday.

The fund was set up in the wake of the suicide bombing in Manchester that killed 22 people less than two weeks before the London attack. It raised £400,000 in its first 48 hours.

"A Saturday night for London, a week after the terrible attacks at London Bridge, is a chance for people to show the unity and resilience of this great city and the generosity of Londoners in getting out and raising money to help the survivors, the victims and their families," comedian Amy Lame, appointed London’s "night czar" by mayor Sadiq Khan, said.

Donald Hyslop, Borough Market chairman of trustees, said: "Borough Market is not just a collection of stalls, restaurants and pubs; it is a community of people.

"Never has that been more apparent than it is now, in this darkest of hours."

It comes as police continue to appeal for information on the attackers and their movements, following revelations that they held a midnight meeting at a gym in Ilford five days before launching the attack.

Relatives of suspected ringleader Khuram Butt said he was partly radicalised by extremist videos he watched on YouTube.

He lived with his wife and children in Barking near fellow attacker Rachid Redouane, while the third attacker Youssef Zaghba lived in Ilford.

Police arrested a 28-year-old man in the early hours of Saturday morning in Barking on suspicion of being concerned in the preparation of acts of terrorism.

Searches of the residential address where he was arrested continue.

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