Muslim mothers should be trained in computing ‘to help to spot radicalisation’

 

Monday 06 January 2014 02:21
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The mothers of Muslims should be trained in basic computing skills so they can spot online radicalisation of their children, a report says.

The study of 350 Muslim women, conducted between last June and October, found that 92 per cent did not understand the term “online radicalisation”, nor that their children could be radicalised online. It said three-quarters of all mothers surveyed had seen or heard their children accessing Islamic lectures, yet 90 per cent were unaware of their content.

“We believe that mothers are trusted anchors within many homes which means, if equipped with the right skills, they have a unique capacity to safeguard their children against internet radicalisation,” the report from women’s charity JAN Trust concluded.

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