Ophelia: Ex-hurricane kills person 'after tree falls on car' in Waterford, Ireland

Woman in 40s killed by falling tree amid 92mph winds

Storm Ophelia's predicted path over Ireland and the UK

A driver has died after a tree fell on a car as ex-hurricane Ophelia sweeps across Ireland.

The woman, reportedly in her 50s, was killed in Waterford after gusts of 92mph (148kph) hit the country's south-west coast on Monday morning.

Her car was travelling close to the village of Aglish when the tree fell on to it.

Authorities have urged the public to stay indoors until the "very dangerous" storm has passed, with forecasters warning stronger winds were expected.

"Please avoid driving today unless an emergency due to dire weather conditions," police told drivers on Twitter.

Around 120,000 homes and businesses have been left without power and all schools and colleges in the Republic of Ireland were shut on Monday.

ESB Networks, which provides Ireland's electricity supply, warned more outages were expected and said repair operations would take several days.

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar urged the public to stay safe, warning: "The advice is: stay indoors until the storm passes.

"Whether that is at work, in their home or some other home, stay indoors. Check on neighbours and relatives.

"Bear in mind it is coming your way and it is a national red alert.

"It is a very dangerous storm. The last time there was a storm this severe 11 lives were lost."

Mr Varadkar added that the National Emergency Co-ordination Group will be meeting throughout the course of the day.

The Republic of Ireland's Met Office has issued a red severe warning for Wexford, Galway, Mayo, Clare, Cork, Kerry, Limerick and Waterford.

Around 120 flights were cancelled at Dublin airport.

Schools were also closed in Northern Ireland, where the Met Office issued covered with an amber warning – meaning there is a "potential risk to life and property" – and forecast gust of up to 75mph.

Around 200 properties in Wales suffered power cuts, a number of schools closed early and the Cleddau Bridge was shut to tall vehicles as remnants if the hurricane reached Britain.

Flood warnings are also in place along the Pembrokeshire coast, parts of west Scotland, north-west England and Cornwall.

Planes were grounded at Manchester Airport, with 20 flights cancelled and passengers warned to check ahead.

The storm was expected to move into Scotland on Tuesday.

"It will be gradually easing up into Scotland overnight and into Tuesday morning, it's weakening as it goes," said Met Office spokesman Grahame Madge.

"Parts of England, areas like the north west, are covered by a warning.

"The impacts will be felt in northern England into Tuesday.

"Winds will be 50 to 60mph, possibly gusting to 70mph, even in the yellow warning areas."

The storm hit the British Isles exactly 30 years after the Great Storm of 1987 killed 18 people.

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