Scottish government calls for UK legal protection of Scotch whisky post-Brexit

The Scotch whisky industry is worth around £4bn to Scotland in exports

Paul Ward
Sunday 30 July 2017 00:17
Comments
Scotland's Economy Secretary Keith Brown wants to protect the Scotch whisky industry.
Scotland's Economy Secretary Keith Brown wants to protect the Scotch whisky industry.

The Scottish Government has called for Scotch to be defined in UK law in order to protect whisky exports after Brexit.

Scotland’s Economy Secretary Keith Brown has written to UK ministers calling for protection of the Scotch whisky industry, in light of International Trade Secretary Liam Fox’s visit to the US this week.

The industry is worth around £4bn to Scotland in exports and an EU definition of whisky currently protects sales from sub-standard products.

Mr Brown said: “Aside from being a key part of Scottish culture and identity, our whisky industry supports around 20,000 jobs.

“The US made clear in the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership discussions that they would support a relaxation of the definition of whisky, which would open the market up to a number of products which do not currently meet that standard.

“Whisky is a product which is worth around £4 billion to Scotland in exports.

“It is vital that we continue to have robust legal protection of Scotch whisky, which is why I have sought clarification from the UK Government as to whether Scotch whisky featured in discussions during last week's trade visit by the Secretary of State for International Trade.

“I am also demanding that the current EU regulations are guaranteed post-Brexit.

“After reports this week that the UK Government is contemplating trade deals that threaten the value and reputation of Scottish produce, once again we can see the confusion which is at the heart of the UK Government's Brexit position.

“We need to be sure that any future deals work for Scotland and are not threatening the livelihoods of our farmers and producers.

“This is why all four UK governments should have oversight of the negotiations to ensure, as far as possible, that the right outcomes for everyone are secured.”

A UK Government spokeswoman said: “Scotch is a UK export success story and we will support the industry so that it continues to thrive and prosper post-Brexit.

“The UK Government has a strong relationship with the Scotch Whisky Association and is working closely with the industry as we aim to secure the best possible deal for the whole of the UK.”

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in