Many people wrongly believe that chocolate, bread and pizza are superfoods, poll claims

Many unaware that kale and spinach classify

Many people wrongly believe that chocolate, bread and pizza qualify as superfoods, according to a poll.

A poll of 2,000 adults found only one-third could confidently say if a food item is considered to be a superfood with more than one in twenty believing fizzy drinks fit into the category.

Curry, cake and beer were also among the items wrongly thought of as superfoods.

Less than half were aware that spinach and kale fit into the food group, while just 10 per cent thought the same of goats’ milk.

The poll, by British goats’ milk producers St Helen’s Farm, also found that when asked what makes something a superfood, more than one-third think "good fats" plays a part.

While 62 per cent also thought antioxidants were a key nutrient in superfoods, 42 per cent admitted they didn’t know what these are.

Almost half believed minerals were another component, and one-quarter thought they should be low in calories.

One-third also said the freshness of a food makes it more or less likely to be a superfood, with three in 10 admitting their decision to purchase edible products had been influenced by how far they had travelled.

Amanda Hamilton, nutritionist and spokesperson for St Helen’s Farm, said: “It’s easy to criticise such labels but the fact is, the term superfood is here to stay so better to help people understand which beneficial food fall into this category and what shouldn’t.

“For me to call something a superfood I’d be looking for something with exceptional levels of nutrient density, or some kind of added benefit that’s hard to get in other ways.

“Although the term isn’t commonly used by experts as there’s no standard criteria that defines it, it is increasingly used by consumers, so it has become a label worth understanding.”

The also found people believe the benefits of superfoods include being full of vitamins, providing antioxidants and a good source of energy.

With many considering alternative milks to be superfoods, one-third of respondents had tried to cut out cows’ milk from their diet.

Ms Hamilton added: “There are no guidelines around superfoods like there are around 5-a-day for example, it is too loose a label to do that.

“From my point of view something like goat’s milk should have the superfood label as it is gentler on the tummy for many people and you don’t miss out on all vital calcium, vitamins and minerals that you expect from milk.

SWNS

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