Theresa May calls Uber's London ban 'disproportionate' and says it damages 'millions of lives'

Ride-hailing firm is planning to appeal after its renewal application was rejected

Sam Lister
Thursday 28 September 2017 20:40
Comments
'I want to see a level playing field. I think a blanket ban is disproportionate,' the PM says
'I want to see a level playing field. I think a blanket ban is disproportionate,' the PM says

Banning Uber in London is a "disproportionate" move that puts thousands of jobs at risk, Theresa May has said

Lives will be damaged by Transport for London's decision backed by Labour London mayor Sadiq Khan to deny it a new operating licence, according to the Prime Minister.

The ride-hailing firm is planning to appeal after its renewal application was rejected on the grounds of "public safety and security implications".

Ms May told the BBC: "At a stroke of a pen, what the mayor has done is risked 40,000 jobs and of course ... damaged the lives of those 3.5 million Uber users.

"Yes there are safety concerns and issues for Uber to address, but what I want to see is a level playing field between the private firms and our wonderful London taxis, our black cabs, our great national institution.

"I want to see a level playing field. I think a blanket ban is disproportionate."

Uber loses licence to operate in London - reaction highlights

A spokesman for the mayor said: "Sadiq has every sympathy with customers and drivers of Uber, but is clear that any anger must be directed at Uber itself.

"Regulation is there for a reason and it would have been wrong for TfL to have renewed Uber's licence if they had concerns about Uber being a fit and proper operator.

"All companies must play by the rules and adhere to the high standards we expect - particularly when it comes to the safety of customers.

"London deserves the best taxi and private hire services available and Sadiq is determined to ensure the capital has a vibrant market, with space for all providers to flourish."

Press Association

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in