How long do UK adults keep their new years resolutions for?

Many said that they gave up on their new years resolutions as they wanted to socialise

Lucy Brimble
Wednesday 05 January 2022 16:17
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<p>UK adults said they made new year’s resolutions to improve their health amongst other things </p>

UK adults said they made new year’s resolutions to improve their health amongst other things

Over half of Britons are most likely to give up on ‘Dry January’ by the second week, a poll reveals.

A poll of 2,000 UK adults found 21 per cent admit they won’t last the whole month and three in 10 will be happy if they stick with their pledge for just two weeks.

But it’s not only the booze that defeats most over-indulged Britons in the New Year - abstinence from chocolate, smoking, biscuits and social media also fall by the wayside.

Needing a drink at the end of the day, wanting to socialise and not wanting to miss out are among the reasons adults miss their indulgences.

And 23 per cent will try so hard not to give in to what they want they’ll leave the house completely, simply to get away from certain temptations.

A spokesperson for Volvic Touch of Fruit, which commissioned the poll, said: “The survey shows how easy it is to fall off the wagon.

“We all look forward to enjoying those naughty little treats every now and again, and to give them up completely is quite a task.”

Finding something else to turn to after a bad day will be the biggest ‘Dry January’ struggle for a third of those polled.

And 31 per cent will be pining after the taste while 29 per cent will find it difficult to miss out during social occasions.

Almost one quarter can’t bear the thought of not drinking at a social event – whilst for 32 per cent, this will be their biggest temptation.

Other enticements include a bad day in the office, going out for food and the classic fear of missing out in general.

But despite this, 43 per cent are doing it to improve their health and 36 per cent are keen to lose weight.

Other incentives include saving money, while more than three in 10 are up for a challenge and want to prove they can give up the bottle.

Wine will be missed by 36 per cent and will also be the biggest lure for 21 per cent, according to the OnePoll study.

And for nearly one third, beer will be the hardest tipple to bid a temporary farewell to.

For the more exotic drinkers, one quarter will miss margarita and strawberry daiquiri’s – while 23 per cent will have the biggest cravings for mojitos, pina coladas and sex on the beach.

The Volvic Touch of Fruit spokesperson added: “It’s great to see so many of us keen to try out a New Year’s resolution.

“Nothing is ever quite like the ‘real deal’ but there are plenty of alternatives out there that can help us last as long as possible.

“We know the power of strength and nature, and we want to provide our consumers with great tips to be their strongest selves from the start of a new year.

“This is why we’ve teamed up with Scarlett Moffatt to create some tasty mocktail recipes to help all those taking part in the challenge of not drinking in January and stay motivated until the end of the month .”

SWNS

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