Four in 10 young women have felt pressure to share nude photos, survey finds

Poll finds 51 per cent of 16- to 24-year-olds surveyed agreed it is normal to send nude photos or videos to someone

Maya Oppenheim
Women's Correspondent
Thursday 26 July 2018 17:46
Comments
Study says young women are more likely to feel 'coerced' into imparting intimate content
Study says young women are more likely to feel 'coerced' into imparting intimate content

Four in 10 young women have felt pressured into sharing nude photos of themselves, a study suggests.

The survey by Status Online – an organisation which supports 16-25 year olds in their couple relationships – says nude selfies and naked video clips are a prominent element of modern relationships.

The poll found 51 per cent of 16- to 24-year-olds surveyed agreed it was normal to send nude photos or videos to someone.

But 31 per cent say they have felt “pressured” to send such material at some point in their lifetime.

The study found young women were more likely to feel “coerced” into imparting intimate content – with 40 per cent of those surveyed saying they have felt “compelled” to send videos or images of themselves naked.

The research also showed 55 per cent of young people who had shared nude material regretted having done so.

This figure rose to 64 per cent among female respondents.

While 60 per cent of young women surveyed found them a “very big turnoff” in online dating, just 15 per cent of young men did.

Denise Hatton, chief executive for YMCA England & Wales, argued that there can be troubling consequences when intimate images are shared.

“We live in a digital age where young people face increasing dangers and pressures when it comes to their personal relationships and bodies,” she told The Independent.

“The internet never forgets, so what may seem like a carefree act in the moment can quickly turn into a never-ending nightmare when pictures are shared.”

“Given the prevalence of this as a normal occurrence, it’s crucial that young people are educated about the law, risks and dangers of ‘sexting’ from an early age, while we also need to ensure they know where to go for help and advice.”

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in