London Zoo keepers capture moment tiger cub takes first wobbly steps outdoors

The determined youngster attempted to copy its mother, tumbling onto the soft grass along the way.

Lottie Kilraine
Thursday 13 January 2022 12:07
The tiger cub and mother at London Zoo (ZSL London Zoo/PA)
The tiger cub and mother at London Zoo (ZSL London Zoo/PA)

London Zoo has captured footage of its one-month-old endangered tiger cub’s first wobbly steps outside.

Zoo keepers spotted the critically endangered Sumatran tiger cub as it ventured outdoors in pursuit of its mother.

Sumatran tigers, from Indonesia are the rarest and smallest subspecies of tiger, with the latest figures suggesting that only 300 remain in the wild.

Zookeepers spotted the critically endangered Sumatran tiger cub’s as it ventured outdoors in pursuit of its mother. (ZSL London Zoo/PA)

On Wednesday, keepers watched as the cub’s mother, Gaysha, carried the one-month-old outside for the first time in the afternoon sun, before taking the opportunity to stretch her legs.

Keepers then captured the moment the determined youngster attempted to copy its mother, tumbling onto the soft grass along the way.

Tiger keeper Kathryn Sanders said: “We were all holding our breath with excitement as the cub tottered around, using all its strength to clamber after mum.

“It was incredible to watch the youngster find its ‘tiger feet’ for the first time.”

The cubs mother, Gaysha, carried the one-month-old outside for the first time in the afternoon sun, before taking the opportunity to stretch her legs. (ZSL London Zoo/PA)

Born almost a year to the day since Gaysha first arrived at London Zoo from Denmark the one-month-old cub is yet to be named.

Keepers will discover if the youngster is male or female at its first health check in a few weeks’ time

Originally expected to be part of a litter of three, the cub’s two siblings did not survive labour.

However, the birth is still a boost for a global breeding programme working with zoos from around the world to protect the species.

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