National Gallery to bring together work from renowned artists for the first time

After Impressionism will go on display from March 25 next year.

Ellie Iorizzo
Monday 23 May 2022 11:45
Paul Gauguin’s Vision Of The Sermon1888 (National Gallery/PA)
Paul Gauguin’s Vision Of The Sermon1888 (National Gallery/PA)

A new exhibition of more than 100 paintings and sculptures by masters including Pablo Picasso, Vincent Van Gogh and Piet Mondrian will go on display at the National Gallery next year.

The ground-breaking exhibit titled After Impressionism will bring together radical art of European cities from 1886 to 1914 for the first time.

The display will begin with work from late 19th-century French artist Paul Gauguin, Dutch impressionist master Van Gogh, French sculptor Auguste Rodin and French post-impressionist painter Paul Cezanne.

Paul Cezanne’s Bathers Les Grandes Baigneuses (National Gallery/PA)

Cezanne’s master piece Bathers (Les Grandes Baigneuses), Gauguin’s Vision Of The Sermon and The Channel of Gravelines, Grand Fort-Philippe by French artist Georges Seurat will serve as particular highlights of the exhibition.

Visitors to the National Gallery will journey through the art of the late 19th and early 20th centuries created in cities such as Paris, Brussels, Berlin, Vienna and Barcelona.

The exhibition will finish with some of the most significant modernist works, ranging from Expressionism to Cubism and Abstraction.

It will showcase work from Dutch master Mondrian, Spain’s Picasso, Austrian painter Gustav Klimt, French Henri Matisse and Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky.

Channel of Gravelines, Grand Fort-Philippe by Georges Seurat (National Gallery/PA)

After Impressionism has been curated by art historian MaryAnne Stevens and Christopher Riopelle, the National Gallery’s Neil Westreich Curator of Post 1800 Paintings, with art historian and curator Julien Domercq.

Stevens said: “In this exhibition we seek to explore and define the complexities of a period in art, and in wider cultural manifestations, that can assert the claim to have broken links with tradition and laid the foundations for the art of the 20th and 21st centuries.”

The artwork is on loan from museums and private collections around the world.

Lenders include the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Musee Rodin in Paris and Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya in Barcelona.

After Impressionism will go on display at the National Gallery from March 25 until August 13 next year.

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