Boris Johnson told by SNP he must resign over No 10 party: ‘Moment of moral reckoning’

Ian Blackford says prime minister no longer has the public’s trust and that he should be removed or quit

Jon Stone
Policy Correspondent
Wednesday 08 December 2021 14:01
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Ian Blackford calls for Boris Johnson's resignation calling it 'a moment of moral reckoning'

Boris Johnson has been urged to resign over an illegal Christmas Party that took place in No10 during lockdown restrictions last year.

SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford said the prime minister was facing “a moment of moral reckoning” and should either quit or be removed by his party.

“Downing Street wilfully broke the rules and mocked the sacrifices we have all made, shattering the public’s trust,” the Scottish nationalist chief said.

“The prime minister is responsible for losing the trust of the people. He can no longer lead on the most pressing issue facing these islands.

“The prime minister has a duty. The only right and moral choice left to him: it is for his resignation. When can we expect it?”

Mr Johnson rejected the call – telling MPs at a heated PMQs session: “I am going to get on with the job and I believe that is what is the right thing to do.”

The prime minister accused the opposition of trying to “muddy the waters of events that took place a year ago”.

Mr Blackford replied that he had seen “no dignity from a prime minister that quite simply just doesn’t get it”.

“It is clear that this prime minister desparately is clinging, onto power and I have nothing left to say to a man whose replies we simply cannot trust ... If he doesn’t resign then he simply must be removed.”

Labour leader Keir Starmer also criticised Mr Johnson, though he stopped short of calling for the prime minister to resign.

The allegations exploded on Tuesday night after ITV News revealed a video showing top No.10 officials laughing about the party.

Mr Johnson says all rules were following during the bash, while Downing Street denies that what occurred was a party, but has offered nothing concrete to substantiate its claim.

The prime minister issued a half-apology on Wednesday at PMQs, saying sorry for the video of his staff causing offence. But he did not apology for the party, still refusing to acknowledge that it occurred.

The Tory leader, whose ministers refused to go on television and radio to defend him this morning, said he would launch an investigation into the get-together led by cabinet secretary Simon Case.

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