Brexit: Conservative Party members tear up membership cards in anger over Corbyn talks

'That’s me finally done'

Tom Embury-Dennis
Wednesday 03 April 2019 12:04
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Jeremy Corbyn says he is 'very happy' to meet Theresa May after her latest Brexit announcement

Furious Conservative Party members are cutting up their membership cards after Theresa May asked Jeremy Corbyn to help her secure a Brexit deal that can get through Parliament.

Downing Street has hinted it wants an agreement with the Labour leader nailed down by the end of the week, in order to meet the EU’s deadline for agreeing a further extension to Article 50 at a summit next week.

But the move was met with fury on Twitter by users claiming to be party members, many of whom have accused the government of “treachery” by ushering in what is likely to be a softer Brexit than they hoped.

“That’s me finally done.. I couldn’t now care less about voting for the next leader,” Adam Brooks, an Essex publican, tweeted alongside an image of his membership card cut in half.

“Jeremy Corbyn has no right to be involved after his behaviour over the last two years.”

Another Twitter user, Alan Day, posted an image of cut up membership cards and tweeted: “Another couple of the families membership cards bite the dust. Direct debits cancelled. This time a Scottish Tory member & GB Ulster Tory member #BrexitBetrayal.”

Michael Worthington, who describes himself as an “ex-Conservative Party member”, posted a photo of a broken membership card and wrote: “Also had enough. I no longer have interest in waiting to vote on leadership campaign.”

Faisal Islam asking a pro-Brexit protester why he feels it is appropriate to call the Prime Minister a traitor

Leave.EU, the unofficial Brexit campaign group, tweeted images of torn-up membership cards and wrote in reference to Mr Corbyn: "Grassroots Conservatives respond to Theresa May handing the Brexit keys to a communist terrorist-sympathiser."

The members' anger was echoed by government minister Nigel Adams, who quit in protest on Wednesday over Ms May’s strategy, describing it as making the “calamity of a Corbyn government” more likely.

Mr Adams resigned as a Wales minister and a government whip – the first walkout since the prime minister opened crisis talks with the Labour leader.

In a stinging letter, he said Ms May faced two “great challenges” she was in danger of failing; to “deliver the Brexit the people voted for” and to prevent Mr Corbyn entering No 10.

The Conservative Party has been contacted for comment.

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