Brexit transition: UK will have no right to be in room while EU laws are made, but will have to follow them

Tory right increasingly outraged by Brexit transition period

Jon Stone
Brussels
Thursday 25 January 2018 14:17
Comments
The European Commission headquarters at the Berlaymont Building in Brussels
The European Commission headquarters at the Berlaymont Building in Brussels

Britain will have no right to even be in the room while EU laws are made, despite having to implement them in full during the Brexit transition period, according to leaked negotiating guidelines drawn up by Brussels.

Updated guidelines for chief negotiator Michel Barnier dated 22 January 2018 specifically state that “as a general rule, the UK will not attend meetings” of key committees involved in drafting European regulations.

EU negotiators are set to insist that “exceptionally, on case-by-case basis” other EU states could “invite” Britain to observe a meeting without any right to influence its content – but only if it is in the interests of the EU, or the issue is solely about the UK.

The as yet unfinalised guidelines are likely to rile up hardline Brexiteers even further, some of whom were already incensed by the idea the UK would have to follow EU laws without voting rights in EU institutions like the council and parliament.

Jacob Rees-Mogg, the keeper of the Brexiteer flame on the Tory right wing, has said such proposals would amount to the UK being a “vassal state” of the EU for years after Britain leaves on 29 March 2019.

The documents also confirm that the EU is pushing ahead with plans to keep free movement extended to the UK in full until at least 2021 as part of the transition, and Brussels will demand a legal veto over any trade deals the UK wants to sign with other countries.

David Davis yesterday rejected the idea that Britain would be a “vassal” of the EU under the plans, telling a parliamentary committee that as long as the arrangement was only for a “short time” it would be an acceptable compromise.

Negotiations on the transition phase are set to restart in earnest within weeks in Brussels, after a pause in talks over the new year period. Discussions on the trade framework are due to begin in March this year.

The Independent revealed over the last week that British officials did not object to the EU’s plans for the Norway-style transition period when the issue was raised with them in meetings. MEPs said the UK had effectively already “agreed in principle” to the thrust of the terms.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in