Electoral Commission ‘concerned’ after Tories vote to place it under government control

Ministers will now be able to direct the election watchdog’s priorities and control the committee that scrutinises it

Jon Stone
Policy Correspondent
Thursday 28 April 2022 19:51
Comments
<p>The vote slipped through the Lords on Wednesday night</p>

The vote slipped through the Lords on Wednesday night

The Electoral Commission has said it is “concerned” about its future independence after the government passed a new law to put it under ministerial control.

The changes included in the Elections Bill, which finally passed the House of Lords on Wednesday night, will hand the government sweeping powers to direct the election watchdog’s priorities.

Opponents say the changes endanger free and fair elections and amount to an “authoritarian power grab” that will let ministers shape how electoral law applies to their own party and to political opponents.

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