Who will replace Ed Miliband when Labour leader resigns after disastrous election?

These are the favourites to succeed Miliband as Labour leader

Ben Tufft
Friday 08 May 2015 14:44
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After a disastrous night for Labour across the country, Ed Miliband has announced his resignation as leader of the party. But who are his possible replacements?

Andy Burnham

Andy Burnham is the bookies favourite, with odds of 5/2 to take the helm. His flagship policy of handing billions of pounds from NHS funds to local councils was reportedly vetoed by Ed Miliband, expect to see this idea revived if he becomes leader. But the shadow health secretary dismissed the idea of assuming the top position last night, when asked by journalists.

Yvette Cooper

Yvette Cooper is a strong contender for leader

Long seen as a favourite for the leadership, Yvette Cooper would be the first female leader of the party, should she be elected. The shadow home secretary and wife of shadow chancellor Ed Balls is a formidable politician. When asked if she saw herself as a future leader, she dodged the question and said: “I really don't think we should be talking about this. We have just had an election and we've got a lot more election results to come.”

Chuka Umunna

Chuka Umunna is reportedly backed by Tony Blair

Despite only being elected in 2010, Chuka Umunna, who represents the London seat of Streatham, is another leadership hopeful. The shadow business secretary is said to have the backing of Tony Blair and apparently names the Tory Michael Heseltine as a political hero.

Dan Jarvis

The Barnsley Central MP, right, recently had his odds of succeeding Ed Miliband slashed

Dan Jarvis, the relatively unknown MP for Barnsley Central since a by-election in 2011, is currently the shadow justice minister, but is said to have leadership ambitions. The ex-Special Forces MP is seen as the New Labour option. Bookmakers put his odds of winning the contest at 5/1.

Tristram Hunt

Tristram Hunt has criticised the Coalition Government for presiding over the closure of Sure Start centres

Tristram Hunt, who is seen as one half of the new Blair and Brown partnership along with Chuka Ummuna, is a possible contender for the leadership. The shadow education secretary was parachuted into the safe seat of Stoke-on-Trent in 2010. Critics have accused the politician, who is the son of a peer, of waging a class war on private schools.

Liz Kendall

Ed Miliband and shadow health minister Liz Kendall at Airedale Hospital maternity ward in Keighley

Liz Kendall is another comparatively unknown MP, who is a strong contender for the leadership. The MP for Leicester West is seen as a Blairite, who believes in choice for patients in the NHS and that private providers should be allowed to work within the health sector.

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