Jeremy Corbyn accuses Theresa May of presiding over 'government in chaos' and 'dismal' Brexit deal

'She must now bring her dismal deal back to the House of Commons next week so parliament can take back control'

Theresa May wins vote of no confidence by 200 to 117

Labour has challenged Theresa May to bring her “dismal” Brexit deal back to parliament next week after she survived a confidence vote from restive Tory MPs.

The prime minister clung on to the leadership by 200 votes to 117 in a secret ballot, following a dramatic day in Westminster, where Conservative rebels tried to topple her in protest at her Brexit plans.

The challenge came after Ms May decided to delay a crunch vote on her Brexit deal on Tuesday, in the face of near-certain defeat from her backbenchers.

Jeremy Corbyn accused the prime minister of presiding over a “government in chaos” and urged her to give MPs the promised vote next week.

Speaking afterwards, the Labour leader said: “Tonight’s vote makes no difference to the lives of our people.

“The prime minister has lost her majority in parliament, her government is in chaos and she is unable to deliver a Brexit deal that works for the country and puts jobs and the economy first.”

He said the prime minister was trying to avoid a doomed vote on a “botched Brexit deal” as she had failed to secure necessary changes from the EU when she made a whistlestop tour around European capitals this week.

“She must now bring her dismal deal back to the House of Commons next week so parliament can take back control,” he said.

“Labour is ready to govern for the whole country and deliver a deal that protects living standards and workers’ rights.”

Shadow chancellor John McDonnell tweeted: “Shocking result for Theresa May.

“Even having offered to go before the next general election she still has a huge 117 Tory MPs, a third of her party, voting against her and not having confidence in her. Wow.”

In the wake of the vote, Ms May faced calls to resign from Brexiteers, including from Jacob Rees-Mogg, who said that she had lost the confidence of more than one-third of her MPs and a majority of backbenchers.

Speaking outside Downing Street after the result was announced, the prime minister acknowledged that a “significant” number of her MPs had voted against her and said: “I have listened to what they said.”

She vowed to seek “legal and political assurances” on the controversial backstop plan to calm MPs fears when she attends a European Council summit in Brussels on Thursday.

Ms May said she and her administration had a “renewed mission”, saying: “Following this ballot, we now need to get on with the job of delivering Brexit for the British people and building a better future for this country.”

However Mr Rees-Mogg, who chairs the European Research Group of Tory Eurosceptics, said: “It’s a terrible result for the prime minister, it really is.”

He added: “Of course I accept this result, but the prime minister must realise that under all constitutional norms, she ought to go to see the Queen urgently and resign.”

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