Why did Labour do so badly in the Brecon and Radnorshire by-election, and what does it mean for the party?

Politics Explained: Jeremy Corbyn’s party saw its vote share plummet in the Welsh seat, and it could be a sign of things to come

Benjamin Kentish
Political Correspondent
Saturday 03 August 2019 20:04
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Lib Dems overturn Tory majority in Brecon by-election

There was no doubt that the Brecon and Radnorshire by-election on Thursday was a major boost for the Liberal Democrats. The party overturned a majority of more than 8,000 to win the seat from Tory MP Chris Davies.

Some commentators even suggested the result was a good one for Boris Johnson. Despite losing the seat, the Conservatives performed better than some in the party had feared, amid reports of a poll boost for the Tories under their new leadder.

No one tried to make such a claim about Labour. Jeremy Corbyn’s party picked up just 1,680 votes – 5.3 per cent of the total, half the number the Brexit Party received, and 12.5 per cent less of the vote share than Labour got two years ago. Its candidate, Tom Davies, came within a whisker of losing his deposit.

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