PMQs: Jeremy Corbyn's side-eye evolves into a death stare

The Labour leader repeatedly asked the PM what effect the tax credit reduction would have

Jeremy Corbyn's sideye has become a full death stare

Jeremy Corbyn’s famed side-eye turned into a death stare as he took the Prime Minister to task over tax credits in the House of Commons on Wednesday.

The Labour leader seized control of the debate as he repeatedly hammered David Cameron over the Conservative leader’s refusal to reassure the House “no one would be worse off” as a result of the tax credits reduction.

“Please give me the answer to a very straightforward question,” Mr Corbyn asked the PM.

“This is not a constitutional crisis; this is a crisis for three million families in this country. For three million families who are very worried what is going to happen next April,” he said after the Tory leader’s continued to evade the question.

The Labour leader’s decision to end his questions with one from a constituent, “Karen”, was met with an explosion of noise and laughter from the Conservative benches.

“It might be very amusing to members opposite,” Mr Corbyn told the House while positively glaring across the floor at the Tory MPs.

Social media users celebrated Mr Corbyn’s performance, with many political pundits also commenting this could be the opposition leader’s most effective PMQs yet.

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