Theresa May 'to replace Downing Street artworks with framed quotations of her own speech'

The change is intended to remind staff of the need to deliver results in tackling inequality and improving the lives of the worst-off

Samuel Osborne
Saturday 23 July 2016 08:56
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Theresa May has vowed to fight the "burning inequality" in modern Britain with a pitch to the centre ground
Theresa May has vowed to fight the "burning inequality" in modern Britain with a pitch to the centre ground

Theresa May will reportedly replace some of the artwork hanging in Downing Street with framed quotations of the speech she made upon becoming Prime Minister.

Ms May's aides are preparing to take down some of the paintings from the Government Art Collection and put up framed quotes from her mission statement, when she pledged to stand up against "the privileged few" and fight "burning injustice".

The change is intended to remind staff they are there to serve the people and of the need to deliver results in tackling inequality and improving the lives of the worst-off, The i reports.

There are also plans to measure progress against her goals every three to six months.

The artwork will be placed in storage while Ms May remains in Downing Street.

Ms May and her husband Philip moved into the four-bedroom fat above 11 Downing Street earlier this week.

Philip Hammond, the new Chancellor, will live in the smaller flat above 10 Downing Street.

UK's May pledges close ties with Germany in Merkel meeting

A recent poll found the new prime minister is seen as less of a natural leader than David Cameron was at the same time in his premiership.

On Thursday, French President Francois Hollande told Ms May the sooner Britain leaves the EU the better.

She told him Brexit did not mean walking away from the "profound friendship" between the two nations but repeated again that "Brexit means Brexit" and that meant reducing immigration.

“The British people gave had a very clear message that we should introduce controls on the movement of individuals from Europe into the UK,” she said.

“We will deliver on that, but we want to get the right deal on the trade of goods and services.”

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