Sean Bean says Jeremy Corbyn is 'sticking up for the working class' and 'talks a lot of sense'

The Games of Thrones star says he is still Old Labour at 'heart'

Jon Stone
Tuesday 03 November 2015 12:17
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Sean Bean as Ned Stark in Game of Thrones
Sean Bean as Ned Stark in Game of Thrones

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is “sticking up” for the working class and “talks a lot of sense”, actor Sean Bean has said.

The Sheffield-born performer, best known for his role as Ned Stark in the fantasy television series Games of Thrones, said that he was “still old Labour at heart”, according to the Radio Times.

“I think he speaks a lot of sense. I don’t mean I want to go back to the 80s, the strikes and stuff like that, but he’s sticking up for the working-class man and it’s time we heard that voice again,” he said.

Mr Bean is also well known for his role as Alec Trevelyan in Goldeneye, Boromir in Lord of the Rings, and Richard Sharpe in the eponymous Sharpe.

He made the comments at a press conference for his new series, the Frankenstein Chronicles

The actor has previously spoken of his respect for traditional Labour party values – describing leading light of the party’s left wing Tony Benn as “fantastic” in a 2012 interview with the Independent.

Mr Corbyn became Labour leader in September after winning a landslide amongst the party’s members, supports and affiliated trade unionists.

His leadership has divided opinion, drawing huge crowds and an enthusiastic army of volunteers – but repelling many in Labour’s establishment and parliamentary party.

In September Harry Potter star Daniel Radcliffe also had kind words for Mr Corbyn, telling the Big Issue magazine that “it is just so nice to have people excited about somebody”.

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