The Government is looking at privatising Channel 4, leaked documents show

The public broadcaster could be sold off

Jon Stone
Thursday 24 September 2015 18:06
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Channel 4 launched in 1982
Channel 4 launched in 1982

The Government is looking at privatising public broadcaster Channel 4, leaked official documents appear to show.

Papers carried by an unidentified official on his way into Number 10 were photographed by a Downing Street political photographer, Steve Back.

The documents, which are partially redacted, say “In your recent meeting with Matt Hancock you … extracting greater public value from the Channel 4 Corporation, focusing on privatisation options in particular whilst protecting …”

The paper carried a partially visible “Recommendation” heading and asks the Secretary of State to “indicate whether you are content with…” something written under that heading.

The memo is dated 24 September 2015 and is addressed to two unnamed secretaries of State. It is marked “Official – sensitive: commercial”. Matt Hancock, mentioned in the memo, is the Cabinet Office minister.

The documents appear to contradict a statement made by Conservative Culture Secretary John Whittingdale late last month, who denied that privatisation was under discussion.

Channel 4 is publicly owned and has a remit to provide a certain amount of public service broadcasting. Under like the BBC the channel sustains itself through the sale of adverts and other commercial activities.

The channel's sale has been mooted before but has never been followed through on.

“The ownership of Channel 4 is not currently under debate. Do I say there are no circumstances in which I would ever consider it? No I don’t,” he told the Guardian Edinburgh International Television Festival.

A spokesperson for the Department for Culture Media and Sport today told the Independent it was considering various courses of action and did not deny that privatisation was on the table as an option.

“The Government has made no decisions regarding reform of Channel 4,” the spokesperson said. “Channel 4 has an important remit and we are looking at a range of options as to how to continue to deliver this, including options put forward by Channel 4."

Downing Street photographers have a history of revealing sensitive information by photographing documents.

It is not always clear whether such leaks are accidental or deliberate on the part of officials and ministers carrying papers, most of whom are now aware of the capabilities of cameras.

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