What would Boris Johnson refusing to send a UK commissioner to Brussels mean?

It will certainly mean fewer Brits around the table, and could be a legally tricky

Jon Stone
Brussels
Thursday 25 July 2019 18:38 BST
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The prime minister makes a statement in the House of Commons yesterday
The prime minister makes a statement in the House of Commons yesterday (AFP)

Boris Johnson has said the UK won’t send an EU commissioner to Brussels, a move intended as a sign that he’s serious about Brexit.

EU commissioners are switched over every five years: each member state gets one, and collectively they make up the EU’s executive arm, the European Commission. They are responsible for coming up with new EU laws and enforcing the existing ones.

Without a commissioner, the UK would have less of a voice in EU policymaking. While commissioners do not actually represent member states – they represent the interests of the EU as a whole – there would be one less Briton sitting at the table when decisions were made.

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