Canadian pharmacy accidentally gives bipolar medicine to children instead of sweets on Halloween

The medicine causes trembling, nausea and drowsiness

Las autoridades también prohibieron los eventos al interior de 'casas embrujadas' y todas las congregaciones alrededor de esta festividad
Las autoridades también prohibieron los eventos al interior de 'casas embrujadas' y todas las congregaciones alrededor de esta festividad

A Canadian pharmacy handed out bipolar medicine to trick-or-treating children after accidently mixing the pills into a sweet basket.

According to reports, a total of seven pills, individually wrapped up in silver capsules, were handed out to the children throughout the night. Police said the pills were not dangerous but could have mild side effects, such as trembling, nausea and drowsiness.

According to CBC News, a customer accidentally dropped her son’s bipolar pills on the floor. The pills were then put on the counter, next to the sweet basket.

Constable Melissa Cliche, of the Quebec City police, said: "Unfortunately, we don't know how, an employee just mixed it with the candy by accident and distributed it to the kids."

The children had been trick-or-treating in Quebec City and were handed the silver-wrapped capsules as they wandered into the pharmacy in pursuit of sweets.

Police later confirmed that the children had not consumed the pills.

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