Anti-abortion group’s headquarters targeted in apparent Molotov cocktail attack

Police are investigating after the Wisconsin Family Action’s office in Madison was badly damaged

<p>The anti-abortion group Wisconsin Family Action was targeted by vandals early Sunday morning</p>

The anti-abortion group Wisconsin Family Action was targeted by vandals early Sunday morning

An anti-abortion group’s Wisconsin headquarters has allegedly been targeted in a Molotov cocktail arson attack.

The Wisconsin Family Action office in Madison was badly damaged after vandals allegedly started a fire, broke windows and graffitied walls overnight Saturday.

A Madison Police Department spokesperson said flames were spotted coming from the building on the 2800 block of International Lane at 6am on Sunday.

The City of Madison Fire Department extinguished the blaze, and no injuries were reported.

Police said a molotov cocktail was thrown inside the building. It failed to ignite. Vandals appeared to have started a separate fire in response.

Madison Police Chief Shon Barnes said his department understands city residents are “feeling deep emotions” about the Supreme Court draft decision to overturn Roe v Wade.

“Our department has and continues to support people being able to speak freely and openly about their beliefs.

“But we feel that any acts of violence, including the destruction of property, do not aid in any cause.”

He added federal law enforcement was working with his department and city fire officials to investigate the arson.

Wisconsin Family Action president Julaine Appling claimed the arson attack was a “direct threat” against the organisation in comments to the Wisconsin State Journal.

“This is the local manifestation of the anger and the lack of tolerance from the pro-abortion people toward those of us who are pro-life,” Ms Appling claimed to the news outlet.

On the walls outside the building, someone reportedly spray-painted: “If abortions aren’t safe then you aren’t either”.

The anti-abortion group did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Protests have been held around the US everyoday since a draft opinion from Justice Samuel Alito leaked on Monday calling the 1973 Roe v Wade decision “egregiously wrong”.

On Saturday night, protesters gathered at the homes of conservative justices Brett Kavanaugh and John Roberts.

A small group gathered at Justice Kavanaugh’s home carrying placards and chanting slogans including: “You don’t care if people die”.

They then marched to Chief Justice Roberts’ home in Virginia where a ring of police officers stood guard.

The protesters were dispersed after a few minutes by police.

Abortion activists groups had called for a day of action against Catholic churches on Sunday, and dioceses and police departments had been on alert.

However, only a handful of small protests eventuated.

In New York, a small group of pro-choice activists held a vigil outside St Patrick’s Cathedral on Sunday.

A group from Rise Up 4 Abortion Rights performed the “protest dance” Un Violador En Tu Camino, or A Rapist in Your Path. The song originated in Chile and has become a rallying for those protesting violence against females.

The day before, a performance artist known as Crackhead Barney led demnonstraters on a march around Catholic churches in New York.

Wearing a swimsuit and carrying a baby doll, the protester reportedly shouted “God killed his son, why can’t I?” outside the Basilica of St Patrick’s Old Cathedral.

The leaked draft opinion revealed that five of the nine justices were in favour of overturning the right to abortion.

The court is expected to make a final decision in June.

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