Arizona man stung up to 1,000 times by bees

The man was working in the back garden of a home in Kingman when he came across the swarm and fled to his vehicle

Alex Ward
Saturday 13 June 2015 10:07
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Bee removal expert Jeff Stacey removes a hive from a chimney in Phoenix. A particular strain of bee has been menacing people and animals in Arizona in recent weeks.
Bee removal expert Jeff Stacey removes a hive from a chimney in Phoenix. A particular strain of bee has been menacing people and animals in Arizona in recent weeks.

Authorities have said that a man is lucky to be alive after he was stung between 500 and 1,000 times be a swarm of bees in Arizona.

The incident, which happened on Friday, saw the so far unidentified man taken in a stable condition to Kingman Regional Medical Centre.

According to Mohave County sheriff’s spokeswoman, Leslie DeSantis, the man had been attacked after disturbing a large hive in the backyard of a home in Kingman, north-west Arizona.

“The number of bees in the shed was unbelievable. The deputy who arrived said it was like something you would see in the movies,” Ms DeSantis said.

Authorities added that the man was working on the property at the time he was stung and sought refuge in his vehicle. He was aided by two others, who were also stung but not hospitalised.

A beekeeper was called to the scene to contain the swarm and was stung 23 times, telling police that it could take days to contain the bees.

A particular strain of bee has been a nuisance for people and pets in Arizona in recent weeks, causing stings that are bad enough in some cases to need a stay in hospital.

In the meantime, authorities are warning residents to stay indoors, avoid walking nearby and drive through the neighbourhood with their car windows closed.

Additional Reporting: Reuters

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