Atlanta police attempt to diffuse tension during traffic stops with educational video; and fail

New video promotes the idea of obedience to police but provides little information on civilian rights

Marta Portocarrero
Friday 04 September 2015 13:58
Comments
Is this police safety video actually educational?

Atlanta's Gwinnet County Police Department is promoting a safety video in an attempt to educate the public in how to behave during a traffics stop. Given all the recent episodes of police violence in the United States, the intention seems positive at first, however, not everyone is happy with the new campaign and its message.

The video includes a scene of a woman arguing with an officer after being pulled over for speeding.

“You know what? Here you go... you can take it even though I wasn’t speeding”.

Another scene shows what the department considers to be a 'more reasonable way to interact with the police'. “I’m late to school, so I’m in a rush", the actor says. "Here you go."

The video's purpose is to demonstrate that 'listening carefully and cooperating with police on traffic stops increases safety', but Marlon Kautz of CopWatch Atlanta has expressed his disagreement.

He told 11alive.com: "They’re completely missing the point... nowhere in this video was the civilian ever a threat to the officer but if the police are interpreting arguing as a threat to officer safety, I think that explains a lot."

Mr. Kautz argues that the video provides little information regarding civilian rights: "You don’t have to answer police questions... you don’t have to explain if you are speeding or why you are speeding. You have the right to remain silent."

The Gwinnett County Police Department justified the video due to growing concerns about ‘the climate across the United States’ and explained that the message was specially directed to teenagers.

For Mr Kautz though, this climate is largely what’s wrong with the picture. "In this time, when so much attention is being given to unjustified police killings, they have seen fit to lecturing the public as to how to act."

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged in