Muslim advocacy group will hand out ‘Islamophobin’ pills at Democrat convention

The Council on American-Islamic Relations handed out thousands of the ‘pills’ at the Republican convention and will continue the campaign

 

Rachael Revesz
New York
Friday 22 July 2016 18:56
comments
'Starts working within five minutes to relieve bigotry and intolerance'
'Starts working within five minutes to relieve bigotry and intolerance'

The largest advocacy group for Muslims in the US is planning to continue handing out its so-called “Islamophobin” pills at the Democratic convention next week.

After hosting many traditional press conferences, perhaps humour could be a winning strategy at a time when the nation's attention is focused on politics.

The pill “promises to treat “blind intolerance, unthinking bigotry, irrational fear of Muslims, (and) US presidential election year scapegoating.”

The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) handed out thousands of packs of the “pills” - sugar-free chewing gum - to attendees and delegates at the Republican convention this week in Cleveland, Ohio, and the organisation plans to continue the campaign in Philadelphia.

CAIR spokesman Ibrahim Hooper told The Independent that the campaign was a “great success” and the commercial had gained hundreds of thousnands of views on YouTube.

CAIR executive director Nihad Awad urged Republicans instead to court Muslims voters, saying they could be crucial in swing states that decide presidential elections.

“Too often over the course of this campaign, Republican presidential candidates have pandered to these inner-core Islamophobic leaders and their supporters with proposals like patrolling so-called Muslim neighbourhoods, surveilling and shutting down mosques, and openly questioning whether a Muslim can serve as president,” Mr Awad said, as reported by Reuters.

Mr Awad said the concept first originated in Sweden, which created a similar product.

CAIR sells the a packet of 12 pills for $1.99 on Amazon.com.

The package reads: “Take two and call a Muslim in the morning."

But it may not be for all users.

The warning reads: “Those who already believe in religious diversity, tolerance and mutual understanding should not use this product."

“Stop taking this product if you begin to develop warm feelings toward Muslims, immigrants or refugees.”

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