Capitol rioter blames internet addiction for breaching rules to watch MyPillow guy videos

Jensen has been compared to a drug addict by his lawyer for violating conditions for his release

Alisha Rahaman Sarkar
Wednesday 25 August 2021 11:16
Comments
<p>File: Trump supporters, including Doug Jensen, centre, confront US Capitol police in the hallway outside of the Senate chamber at the Capitol </p>

File: Trump supporters, including Doug Jensen, centre, confront US Capitol police in the hallway outside of the Senate chamber at the Capitol

A man charged with taking part in the 6 January US Capitol riots claimed his addiction to the internet led him to violate his release agreement.

Iowa-based Doug Jensen, 42, was released from prison in July on the condition that he stays away from the internet, including not having access to his family’s internet-connected devices.

However, Mr Jensen's lawyer Christopher Davis wrote in a court filing on Sunday that the accused conceded he violated the terms of his release by “accessing a video-sharing website that features misinformation about Covid-19 vaccinations and the 2020 presidential election.”

Mr Davis equated Mr Jensen’s situation to that of a relapsed drug addict.

“If a drug abuser relapses, there is typically a sanction protocol in place to help the person deal with substance abuse issues. Mr Jensen requests that this honourable court treat his violation in a similar matter,” he said.

On 13 August, the Trump supporter was caught viewing videos on Rumble, a far-right video streaming platform, when pretrial services authorities showed up at his door, according to the prosecutors. An officer caught him in his garage streaming news from a far-right website through a wifi-enabled iPhone.

The prosecutors claimed that Mr Jensen, when confronted about the violation, “provided his pretrial service officer with one excuse after another.”

“Jensen eventually admitted that in the previous week, he had spent two days watching Mike Lindell’s [founder and CEO of MyPillow] Cyber Symposium regarding the recount of the presidential election,” the filing read.

Following the incident, US attorney Channing Phillips wrote in a court filing seeking Mr Jensen’s return to prison as his alleged “disavowal of QAnon was just an act.”

Mr Jensen, a follower of the QAnon conspiracy theory, was seen chasing Capitol police officer Eugene Goodman while wearing a shirt with “Q” emblazoned on it. He faces charges including civil disorder, assaulting, resisting or impeding a law enforcement officer.

During his release after spending six months in prison, Mr Jensen's attorney claimed he had renounced his previous beliefs in the QAnon conspiracy and “promised he would abide by whatever terms the court set.”

Mr Jensen had told the court that he had been “duped” by QAnon conspiracy theories, where he “bought into a pack of lies.”

Mr Jensen is likely to undergo a mental health evaluation scheduled for Friday.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged in