Ikea monkey Darwin is 'a little person' insists owner embroiled in custody battle

Darwin, who some have dubbed the 'Toronto One', was taken in by Animal Services after being found in the furniture store dressed in a sheepskin coat

Rob Williams
Thursday 20 December 2012 13:25
Comments
The small monkey was found wandering around in Ikea
The small monkey was found wandering around in Ikea

A monkey, who became a global internet sensation after he was found wandering around Ikea in an oversized coat, is now at the centre of a custody battle.

Darwin, who some have dubbed the 'Toronto One', was taken in by Toronto Animal Services after being found in the furniture store dressed in a sheepskin coat.

The monkey's owner, Yasmin Nakhuda, a property lawyer, protested outside the animal services offices with 15 other people yesterday, ahead of today's court hearing.

The protesters chanted and held placards saying 'Free Darwin Now!' and 'Give Darwin back we miss him'.

Yasmin Nakhuda, who described the monkey as a 'little person', has said the public does not understand the close relationship she and her family had with the animal.

"Unless you have owned a primate, you can’t really understand my relationship with Darwin," Nakhuda said during the rally.

"He was not a dog, he was not a cat, he was a little person."

Yasmin Nakhuda said the animal was more like a child than a pet, continuing: "Japanese macaques, they have 93 per cent human DNA. So, he would act like a little child, and therefore when I call him my son, I’m not mental," she said. "I don’t think that’s the situation here."

She also revealed how she had bought the monkey a Santa Claus outfit, a christmas dress and a bow-tie for New Year.

Nakhuda, who will appear in court today, is expected to argue the monkey was "unlawfully" taken from her.

She has already been fined C$240 (£151) for illegally keeping the animal but did not face criminal charges.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in