Mexican drug boss Joaquin 'El Chapo' Guzman moved to jail on US border

A Chihuahua state official said he believed Guzman would be moved to the United States in a matter of weeks

Saturday 07 May 2016 23:25
Comments
A senior Mexican security official said Guzman should be extradited before July
A senior Mexican security official said Guzman should be extradited before July

Mexican drug boss Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman has been moved from a jail in central Mexico to a prison in Ciudad Juarez, a northern city on the US border, in a move that appears to bring him closer to extradition to the United States.

Guzman, head of the Sinaloa drug cartel, was one of the world's most wanted drug kingpins until his capture in January, six months after he broke out of a high-security penitentiary in central Mexico through a mile-long tunnel.

Chapo, or "Shorty," faces charges ranging from money laundering to drug trafficking, kidnapping and murder in cities that include Chicago, Miami and both Brooklyn and Manhattan, New York.

His lawyer, Juan Pablo Badillo, said Guzman was moved early on Saturday, but he was not sure why.

"It's an absurd action, illogical," said Badillo. "The authorities shouldn't do this. It was totally unexpected."

Guzman's lawyers will meet to plot a course of action, Badillo added.

"At this moment, he can't be extradited," said Badillo, noting that the legal process is not yet finished.

Eduardo Sanchez, a spokesman for Mexico's presidency, said Guzman's transfer to the state of Chihuahua was due to upgrades at his previous location, the Altiplano jail in central Mexico, and not part of an effort to deport him to the United States.

However, a senior Mexican security official said Guzman should be extradited before July and would probably be housed initially in the US prison in Marion, Illinois, pending trial.

"I think they'll do it in the first half of this year," the official said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

A Chihuahua state official, who also asked to remain anonymous, said the presence of a US consulate in Ciudad Juarez meant Guzman's handover could be processed faster than through the US embassy. He said he believed Guzman would be moved to the United States in a matter of weeks.

Just across the border from Ciudad Juarez is the US Fort Bliss military base, where Guzman could be taken.

Earlier this year, Reuters reported that prosecutors in El Paso, the city on the other side of the border from Ciudad Juarez, had staked a claim to try Guzman if he is extradited. Other U.S. attorneys' offices with cases against Guzman will also bid to try him first after extradition. (Reporting by Gabriel Stargardter; Editing by G Crosse and Lisa Von Ahn)

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in