Father warned murdered jogger against using path without him

Karina Vetrano's body was found near her home in Queens, New York, by her father

The master's graduate was going on her routine jog when she was killed
The master's graduate was going on her routine jog when she was killed

Police have launched a murder investigation after the body of a jogger was found near her New York home.

Her father discovered his daughter’s body face down on Tuesday evening in marshland about half a mile away from their house in Queens, according to police.

The 30-year-old, identified as Karina Vetrano, had set off from her home to go for a jog about 5pm on Tuesday near Gateway National Park.

Police chief Robert Boyce told reporters that Ms Vetrano normally jogged with her father, but he did not go with her that night as he had a back injury. When she did not come home, he set out with police detectives and a bloodhound.

Mr Boyce said her father had asked Ms Vetrano not to take that route without him.

"She is an active jogger. She jogs here normally everyday with her father," he said. "Her father was not running with her last night. She lives a couple of blocks away."

Police said she had been strangled and there were signs of hemorrhaging.

The path she jogged along was a common running route, shared by pedestrians and cyclists.

"Right now we're investigating anybody who uses this park," said Mr Boyce.

Ms Vetrano graduated from St John’s University in 2015 with a master’s degree, and she was working as a caterer in Howard Beach.

On her Instagram page, she described herself as a “day dreamer” and a “thrill seeker”.

The case in Queens has echoes of the famous Central Park assault in 1989, when former investment banker Trisha Meili was raped and left for dead by Matias Reyes. Five black and hispanic young men were wrongly accused and imprisoned for the crime until Reyes confessed in 2002.

Although the Central Park jogger case gained worldwide notoriety, there have been multiple attacks in 2016 alone.

The NYPD told The Independent they had no figures for the number of women who have been killed or attacked while jogging, although there were a total of 93 people raped by strangers in New York City last year.

In April, a 23-year-old woman was jogging in Prospect Park in Brooklyn around 5am when a man attacked her from behind, threw her to the ground and said he was going to sexually assault her. While she fought him off, he cut her index finger with a knife.

In the same area in June, a woman walking about a block from Prospect Park was approached from behind and shoved to the ground by a man who punched her and tried to rape her. The 34-year-old fought him off until he gave up.

On 17 May, a 42-year-old woman was jogging around 7.30pm in Gorman Park in Manhattan, when she was raped at knifepoint.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in