Former Navy pilot says crews observed UFOs daily

Report on unidentified aerial phenomena to be delivered to Senate next month

Graeme Massie
Los Angeles
Friday 14 May 2021 21:29
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Task Force Report On UFO Intelligence Expected By June 1

A former Navy pilot says flight crews saw UFOs maneuvering in restricted airspace off Virginia every day for years.

Lieutenant Ryan Graves claims that he and other members of his F/A-18 fighter squadron all detected unidentified flying objects for two years, beginning in 2015.

The former serviceman called the objects a security threat in an interview with 60 Minutes, set to air on CBS on Sunday.

He is one of a number of former military personnel to talk publicly about the experiences with what the Pentagon now calls unidentified aerial phenomena or UAP.

Lt Graves told the TV show that the sightings were so common that crews eventually took them for granted.

“I am worried, frankly. You know, if these were tactical jets from another country that were hanging out up there, it would be a massive issue,” said Lt Graves.

“But because it looks slightly different, we’re not willing to actually look at the problem in the face. We’re happy to just ignore the fact that these are out there, watching us every day.”

He told the show that pilots have speculated that what they have seen could be secret US technology or an enemy spy platform.

Lt Graves watched an unclassified unidentified aerial phenomena (UAP) video and added: “This is a difficult one to explain. You have rotation, you have high altitudes. You have propulsion, right? I don’t know. I don’t know what it is, frankly.

“I would say, you know, the highest probability is it’s a threat observation program.”

The Senate Intelligence Committee has ordered the Director of National Intelligence and the secretary of Defence to put together a report on unidentified aerial phenomena and deliver it next month.

Luis Elizondo, a former Department of Defence official who investigated UAP for nearly a decade, claims that the technology on display is much more advanced than anything currently used by the US military.

“Imagine a technology that can do 600 to 700 G-forces, that can fly 13,000 miles an hour, that, that can evade radar and can fly through air and water and possibly space, and oh, by the way, has no obvious signs of propulsion, no wings, no control surfaces and yet still can defy the natural effects of Earth’s gravity. That’s precisely what we’re seeing,” he said.

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