Eight people filming ‘Bad Girls Gone God’ reality show rescued off Arizona mountain

‘We had no idea going into it that this apparently was one of the hardest trails in Phoenix’

Group filming ‘Bad Girls Gone God’ documentary had to be rescued on Camelback Mountain

Eight people reportedly filming a religious reality show called Bad Girls Gone God had to be rescued off a mountain in Arizona.

Three people were taken to hospital for heat-related problems. The Phoenix Fire Department said on Facebook that the people on the women’s retreat needed help to leave the Echo Canyon Trail on Camelback Mountain.

Fire officials said the group began their hike around 7am and didn’t bring a lot of water or other supplies.

Several of the hikers told KPNX that they had flown to Pheonix from out of state to take part in the faith-based reality programme.

They added that the show is focused on health and wellness and that those taking part engage in physical exercises.

One of the hikers, Kristin Livingston, told KPNX that the hike was supposed to be a “spiritual” challenge but that they didn’t realize how difficult the endeavour would be.

“We definitely didn’t realize just how intense it was,” Ms Livingston said.

Two women, aged 50 and 42, and a 24-year-old man were taken by ambulance to hospital after hiking in heat reaching above 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38C), according to CBS News. All were reported to be in stable condition after being escorted off the mountain.

The remaining five people were taken down the mountain via helicopter or wheel basket.

“Today was one for the books!” the fire department wrote as they posted a video of the rescue.

Fire officials said the hikers were spread out along the trail, making the rescue effort more complicated.

Jasmine Hunter told KPHO that the group were there as part of the reality show.

“When we get together, we praise, we worship, we do different activities that not only test our physical but our spiritual capabilities as well,” she said.

Ms Hunter added that she was one of the people who made it down the mountain first and that she was unaware that others were fighting to get back down.

“They noticed they weren’t coming, the stream slowing down. We couldn’t reach anybody on the phone anymore and that’s when we were like, we need to activate,” she said.

“We had no idea going into it that this apparently was one of the hardest trails in Phoenix,” Ms Livingston told KPHO. “I think they just have dehydration and things like that. In the name of Jesus, they’re going to be OK!”

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in