Texas rattlesnakes are hiding in pool noodles

Authorities say that the best way to handle rattlesnakes is by ‘backing away slowly’

Sravasti Dasgupta
Wednesday 18 May 2022 06:25
Comments
<p>Authorities in Texas warned residents of rattlesnakes in swimming pools after one was found in a pool noodle</p>

Authorities in Texas warned residents of rattlesnakes in swimming pools after one was found in a pool noodle

Authorities in Texas have warned residents against rattlesnakes after a reptile was found by a family in their swimming pool.

Salado Texas Volunteer Fire Department said in Facebook post last week that residents should be cautious while using swimming pools this summer as rattlesnakes seek cooler areas due to the heat.

“Before kicking back and relaxing near your pool this summer. We are warning families to be on the lookout for rattlesnakes,” it said in the post.

“There could be snakes in your pool noodles. With the temperatures getting hotter, it’s only natural for these snakes to be looking for an cooler place to stay. Snakes will typically seek out dark spaces, so it’s best to keep your pool toys elevated or in some type of sealed container.”

Pool noodles cylindrical tubes made of foam and used for floating by people when they learn to swim.

The warning was issued after a family that was using a swimming pool picked up a pool noodle and a rattlesnake came out, reported USA Today.

“When someone picked up one of their pool noodles, a large rattlesnake fell out. And they realized later that several baby snakes were still inside,” the fire department said.

Authorities said that the best way to handle rattlesnakes is by “backing away slowly, so always try to avoid panicking!”

“Be sure to stay safe this summer and check your pool noodles just in case!” the post said.

There are 10 species of rattlesnakes in Texas including the most common, the western diamondback, according to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

The department also said that most snake bites are the result of humans being reckless or threatening to the snakes.

In case of a snake bite, the Salado Volunteer Fire Department advises calm and heading to the hospital as soon as possible.

It has also asked residents to describe the snake to hospital staff “as best as you can to get appropriate care”.

“Pick up items around your home where snakes can hide. Check your children’s play areas before allowing them outside to play. If you or someone you know is bit, call 911 immediately,” the fire department said in another post.

Research shows that snakes often help humans by controlling pest populations.

If snakes are found in homes, officials suggest calling in experts who can help remove them without harming the reptiles, reported KXAN.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in