‘The people have spoken’: Resurfaced video shows George Bush conceding defeat to Clinton in 1992 election

Donald Trump has claimed victory and threatened legal action, despite the US election remaining too close to call

George H. W. Bush concedes to Clinton with states to go in 1992

A video of George Bush senior conceding defeat to Bill Clinton in the 1992 US presidential election has resurfaced on social media, in contrast with Donald Trump’s false victory claims and lawsuits to preventing the counting of votes.

In the widely shared video, Bush tells supporters that “the people have spoken”, that he respects “the majesty of the democratic system” and that his administration would “work closely with [Clinton’s] to ensure the smooth transition of power” after losing the election.

“Hey listen you guys,” the video shows Bush saying in the Westin Galleria Hotel in Houston, Texas as he raises his hands and appears to struggle to speak over a cheering crowd chanting “thank you George”.

“Here is the way I see it. Here’s the way we see it and the country should see it,” he said. “The people have spoken and we respect the majesty of the democratic system.” Bush said he had called Clinton and offered his congratulations for running a strong campaign.

“I wish him well in the White House,” he continued. “And I want the country to know that our entire administration will work closely with his team to ensure the smooth transition of power.

“There is important work to be done and America must always come first, so we will get behind this new president and wish him well.”

His speech comes in contrast to President Donald Trump’s reaction to the announcement of election results in 2020.

Trump has not yet lost the 2020 US election, which remains too close to call.  Democratic candidate Joe Biden appears close to victory after he won the key battleground states of Michigan and Wisconsin, but the definitive results will be known in the next few hours or days after key states finish counting all the votes.  

But Mr Trump has falsely claimed victory, announced he would pursue a recount in Wisconsin and threatened legal action to stop the counting of the votes in Pennsylvania.

Bill Clinton, then governor of Arkansas, won the overwhelming majority of electoral college votes in the 1992 US Presidential election – defeating Bush 370 votes to 168. Bush was the last US President to serve only one term.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in