Bernie Sanders mocks Koch brothers after 'grossly misleading' Medicare for All study

The Vermont senator says the study was a response to the growing support for his 'Medicare for All' bill. 

 

Kimberley Richards
New York
Tuesday 31 July 2018 17:09
Comments
Bernie Sanders
Bernie Sanders

Bernie Sanders has responded to a study projecting his “Medicare for All” bill (M4A) will cost $32.6 trillion – calling it “grossly misleading” and “biased”.

“This grossly misleading and biased report is the Koch brothers response to the growing support in our country for a ‘Medicare for all’ programme”, the veteran Vermont senator said.

The Mercatus Centre at George Mason University published a study earlier this week with projections on Mr Sanders’ single-payer health care programme that guarantees health care coverage to all Americans.

Its projections suggested that if the plans were enacted in 2018 and implemented between 2022 and 2031, it would cost $32.6 trillion over 10 years.

“Doubling all currently projected federal individual and corporate income tax collections would be insufficient to finance the added federal costs of the plan,” the study read.

Mr Sanders’ office has not immediately responded to The Independent’s request for comment on the study’s projections.

Mr Sanders tweeted that the study was an attempt to “trash Medicare for All,” while noting the conservative Koch brothers gives funding to the Mercatus Centre.

Two of America’s richest men, billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch are known for supporting economically conservative causes. They have used their wealth to push for small government and a free economy.

Charles Blahous, the study’s author, insisted it was his own work and denied they had been involved in its creation.

Mr Sanders’ plan would provide coverage for various elements of health care, including preventative to emergency care, mental health and substance abuse services and prescription medications – and all by a federally administered single-player health system. The senator’s plan projects overall US health care savings.

The Mercatus Centre also projected the plan would garner savings, like from lower prescription costs by $846bn by 2031. But it forecast an increase in health care spending in other areas, for instance by, “covering the previously uninsured, by eliminating cost-sharing for those already insured, and by increasing the range of health services covered”.

Mr Sanders has since posted a video on Twitter addressing the Mercatus Centre study, while also taking aim at the Koch brothers. “A Medicare for All health care system would save the average family significant sums of money,” Mr Sanders said. As an example, the senator cited reducing administrative costs he said was, “now taking place as a result of the billing, bureaucracy and and insatiable greed within the insurance industry”.

A Pew Research study published last year found a growing support in Americans, driven by Democrats, for single-payer health coverage.

“If every major country on earth can guarantee health care to all, and achieve better health outcomes, while spending substantially less per capita than we do, it is absurd for anyone to suggest that the United States cannot do the same,” Mr Sanders said.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in