Most Americans disapprove of Biden, Congress, and Supreme Court performance, new poll finds

The Quinnipiac University poll found Americans disapprove of the job performance of all three branches of the federal government

Andrew Feinberg
Washington, DC
Thursday 19 May 2022 16:49
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Nearly two-thirds of Americans are giving President Joe Biden negative marks on his handling of the US economy, while seven in 10 now want Supreme Court justices to serve term limits, according to a newly-released Quinnipiac Universitypoll.

The survey of 1,586 adults conducted from 12 May to 16 May found 57 per cent of respondents disapprove of Mr Biden’s job performance, with the share of respondents disapproving of his work on the economy was 63 per cent, with only 32 per cent approving.

Mr Biden still commands a bare majority of support on his handling of the Covid-19 pandemic — a share of 48 per cent approving to 47 per cent disapproving, but the survey found him underwater on the US response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine (44 per cent approving and 50 per cent disapproving) and the situation along the US-Mexico border, with 58 per cent of voters disapproving and only 28 per cent approving.

Both Democrats and Republicans in Congress drew poor reviews for their job performance as well, with 64 per cent of adults disapproving of the GOP and 62 per cent disapproving of congressional Democrats.

But Republicans currently hold a five-point advantage on the generic congressional ballot. Forty-seven percent of respondents said they would want to see the GOP control the House, and 48 per cent said they would like to see the Senate revert to Republican control as well. Just 43 per cent of respondents said they would like Democrats to retain control of each chamber.

Hispanic voters, traditionally a bastion of support for Democrats, gave Mr Biden and Democrats in Congress especially poor marks, with 48 and 47 per cent of Hispanic respondents saying they want GOP control of the House and Senate, and Mr Biden only garnering approval from 26 per cent of Hispanics.

The Judicial Branch of the US government also appears to have lost the esteem it once enjoyed among most Americans, with 52 per cent of respondents disapproving and only 40 percent approving of how the high court handles its’ responsibilities.

Nearly two out of three Americans — 63 per cent — said the court is mainly motivated by politics, and an overwhelming majority of 69 per cent saying they support limits on how long justices, who currently enjoy lifetime tenure, can serve.

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