Charlottesville: Alex Jones claims white supremacist protesters were 'just Jewish actors'

Mr Jones has repeatedly said he regularly talks with the President

Andrew Buncombe
New York
Tuesday 15 August 2017 13:01
Comments
Alex Jones says KKK are sometimes really 'just Jewish actors'

Alex Jones, the broadcaster known for giving loud voice to wild conspiracy theories without providing any evidence, has claimed the KKK protesters in Charlottesville were in truth left-wing Jewish actors looking to cause trouble.

Mr Jones, whose views are said to frequently influence the thinking of Donald Trump, has previously claimed that the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in which 26 people were killed, was a hoax.

In his latest comments, delivered after a 32-year-old anti-fascist activist was killed and up to 20 people were hurt during a white supremacist protest in Virginia, Mr Jones claimed the people wearing KKK robes looked like the “cast of Seinfeld”.

Alex Jones on InfoWars: There's a Deep State coup planning to kill the President

“I’ve been to this events,” said Mr Jones, host of the The Alex Jones Show. “They were just Jewish actors. Nothing against Jews in general, but they are leftists Jews that want to create this clash and they go dress up as Nazis.”

He added: “I have footage in Austin - we’re going to find it somewhere here at the office - where it literally looks like cast of “Seinfeld” or like Howard Stern in a Nazi outfit.

“They all look like Howard Stern. They almost got like little curly hair down, and they’re just up there heiling Hitler. You can tell they are totally uncomfortable, they are totally scared, and it’s all just meant to create the clash.”

The violence in Virginia, which saw anti-Nazi protester Heather Heyer killed when a car was allegedly driven into her, has been widely condemned. Mr Trump has been criticised for being slow to call out white supremacists and racists present. A 20-year-old man, James Fields, has been charged with her murder.

Initially, Mr Trump condemned the “egregious violence” and then, more than a day later and under intense criticism, he issued another statement in which he named those groups behind the criticism.

“Racism is evil,” Mr Trump said on Monday, speaking from the White House. “And those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans.”

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged in